Présentation Creative Commons CC-Kiwi VF

Présentation Creative Commons CC-Kiwi VF

November 8, 2019 15 By Bernardo Ryan


Have you ever wondered how to download and share digital content legally ? How do you let people know that you’d want them to re-use your own work ? Creative Commons licenses can help you do both. We’ll show you how. Our world exploded with digital opportunities. Now we can communicate share and work together using the exceptional distribution network that is the Internet. Information and content can fly between us in exciting new ways. But it’s important to know that when something is created, say a photo or a document, or a music track it’s automatically protected by copyright. Copyright enables people to say who can share and re-use their creations. You must always obtain someone’s permission before sharing or re-using their work even when it’s posted online. But what if a creator wants everyone to use his work without the hassle of granting permission over and over. This is where Creative Commons can help. Creative Commons provide licensing tools that are free to use. You can applied a license to your work, which refines your copyright and streamlines how you give permissions. Zack here downloads the photo called CC-Kiwi that he wants to use in his science project. He can do this without asking Kiri, the photographer, first, because she’s already given permission with a Creative Commons license. Kiri’s license is legally robust, but easy for Zack to understand. She’s told the word, including Zack, that they can use CC-Kiwi as long as they acknowledge her as the original photographer. They are more rules Kiri could have included. Creative Commons license is made up of license elements. You can think them as rules. And each have its own special symbol. This is attribution. It means that Zack must acknowledge Kiri when he publishes his science project containing her photo. This is non-commercial. It’s means no one else but Kiri is permitted to make money from CC-Kiwi. Tim wants to print the photo onto tee-shirts and distribute them to friends. He can do this, but he must not sell them. This is no-derivative. And it means that Kiri has not given permission to change her photo. Kate can use CC-Kiwi on her design blog, but will need to ask Kiri before retouching or mixing up the image. And this is share alike. It means that new creations that use CC-Kiwi need to carry the same license. Jack incorporates his own remix of CC-Kiwi in his video installation But he must share the work under the same term that Kiri has. Each Creative Commons license gives permission to share and include the attribution rule. So people who finds your Creative Commons work are automatically allowed to share it but are required to acknowledge you if they do. The other tree license elements are optional and you can choose witch one to add, if any. Here are the six combinations that make up Creative Commons licenses. The differences between them is how many rules applied when someone which use your work The attribution license allows most freedom, and the attribution non-commercial no-derivative license allow the least freedom. The attribution license and the attribution share-alike license are sometimes refers to as free cultural works approved licenses. These tree licenses restricted commercial use of the work. And these two licenses do not give permission for adapting or re-mixing. These two licenses requires new works to be license under the same terms. To choose and applied one of these licenses, and view their terms in more details visit us at creativecommons.org Or you can answer some questions to help you decide which license best suited you need at creativecommons.org/choose They are some goods ways to find the other people Creative Commons licensed works on line. You can use a search filter by going to the Creative Commons’ website. Why not try the jamendo website for music, flickr for images, or digitalnz for new-zealand content. Using Creative Commons licenses could help your creation reach more people. Maybe you want to connect with others across the globe and take us improving a report. Or maybe you just want to have fun remixing someone else work. Whatever reasons you have to share your work, you find there are scientists educators, companies, and public agencies who using Creative Commons. By opening up permission just imaging how much we can achieve : collaborating on what we have in common, being open about big decisions and finding solutions in the spacing between us. Let’s work together confidently and legally ! It’s good to share with Creative Commons !