How To Make Motion Graphics for Video Marketing

How To Make Motion Graphics for Video Marketing

September 13, 2019 20 By Bernardo Ryan


What if there was one tiny little
graphic thingy you could do in your video that would make everyone want to watch it all the way through to the end, no artistic
skill required? That’s our subject today. Stay tuned. I’m gonna make you a rock star video
marketer, in ten, nine… …two, one. Hi, I’m Steven Washer with BrainyVideo,com. It’s the little things that mean so
much to your viewers. If you can make them comfortable while they’re watching your video they’ll be much more likely to watch it all the way to the end. On the other hand, if you make them all
tense and fidgety, they’ll probably abandon the video very
quickly, and your super duper call to action will never be seen. The worst part is you won’t know why you
made your audience fidgety and so you won’t be able to fix the problem. So, what I’m going to show you today is
something that’s very easy to do and will make you look
like a pro video marketer. I think you’ll really like what this
does to your videos. Now, the thing to understand is that when you do this it makes the moment feel either
comfortable or tense. There’s not a lot of in between. It’s like
a ten or a zero. Fortunately, it’s super easy to get to comfortable once you see it. Now, in order to teach this I need to introduce a new term. You might be familiar with it, but maybe you’ve never quite thought it all the way through. By the way,
I’ve been using it all during the introduction. The term is motion
graphics. It means anything on the screen other than the person or a prop
that doesn’t naturally exist in the environment. So, it could be a piece of
text a photo in animation or a drawing. Also, it comes in and goes out all
by itself. That’s all there is to it. Obviously we’re not going to look at how
to deal with all these different types. I’m gonna show you how to solve the biggest problem in this hidden corner of video marketing that everyone
takes for granted and that practically no one gets all the way to comfortable
with except the pros. So are you ready? We’re going to look at text, since text is the most often used element of what? “Oh, I know! I know! Motion Graphics.” Well, yes, that’s right, Stevie. Motion Graphics. You’re so smart. Here, have a candy. You know, Stevie’s been stuck here behind the screen ever since I did that video on introverts, and he doesn’t seem to want to come out
quite frankly, and I’m getting a little worried. “I’m worried about you.” Where was I? Oh, right. Motion Graphics. The basic problem is that people forget
the two simple rules that guide the placement of text on the screen. The first and most
important is the Rule of Separation. You must separate your text from your
subject, unless the text describes the subject. By subject I mean, you know, just
what you’re seeing on the screen. So, let’s take a look at this graphic
right now. How about this graphic? Is it describing
me, since I’m the subject right now, or is it describing something else? Exactly, it’s something else: the design concept. So, since it’s not part of me, part of the
subject, is it separated enough for you to feel comfortable, or does it make you
feel fidgety? If you said fidgety, you get a point. The feeling is fidgety because it makes
you feel cramped or claustrophobic. But there are other ways to make your
viewer feel fidgety. The text could be too far away. It could be too small for the shot. Or it could extend off the screen. But if it’s separated just enough so that
it doesn’t look like it’s part of you, and it’s a balanced enough, so that it doesn’t put too much weight
on one side of the screen, or on the top or on the bottom, and if it leaves gradually instead of, you know, clicking
out of a website, then it will be comfortable, and your viewers
will likely watch it all the way through. So, just remember: not too close, and not too far, with an entrance and an exit like a movie star. Not too fat, and not too thin,
or you’ll make me want to check into a loony bin. A loony bin. “I’m trying to watch Downton Abbey,
would you please just keep it down a little bit?” Ok, sorry. Well, another time, I mean, if
you want, we can talk about the second major rule of motion graphics: visibility. I mean, nothing is worse than text that
you can’t quite see. And there are lots of things that you
can do to fix this. I’ll even give you the fonts that produce
the best response. So, for better rhyme and reason in your messages, I’m Steve Washer with BrainyVideo.com