How to make a Savile Row Suit (Part 1) – with Anderson & Sheppard | FASHION AS DESIGN

How to make a Savile Row Suit (Part 1) – with Anderson & Sheppard | FASHION AS DESIGN

February 20, 2020 100 By Bernardo Ryan


Oh hi, Michelle. It’s Colin Heywood from Anderson & Sheppard. Very well, thank you. How are you? Yes, it’s going very well, thanks, and just
want to say how honored we are to be involved and thank you for selecting us to showcase
our suit. Can I just run through the details with you? So, it’s going to be a three-piece, single-breasted
suit, isn’t it? In a plain navy blue hopsack material. And I’ve got the fabric here in front of me. So, it’s a Smith fabric, which is one of the
companies we use a lot. Yes, it’s a nice classic blue, so it’s going
to, you know, really showcase our sort of cut. –Four. –Four. –Eighteen and a half. –Eighteen and a half. –Thirty two. –Thirty two. –Forty three. –Forty three. I’m looking for the length of the coat. But what we’re also doing is we’re going to find out the natural waist. –Relax please, sir. You just have to press and if someone is standing right what’ll happen is their center of gravity it’s like a see-saw, you can just press it
and it starts to topple forward naturally. So, on Matthew, we’re probably going around
18 1/2. Then down to the length of the coat. 42. We go to the back of the knee, which on the
measurements is 43. For me, I’d probably just come a fraction
longer, sir. The cuff on the shirt looks a little short. If the shirt were a little longer, I’d bring
the cuff down. Just a fraction. Once again, we can have a look at the fitting
stage and determine if need to make any adjustments. –Twenty five. –Twenty five. –Right. At the end of the day, our customers could
be wearing a suit all day long. It needs to obviously look and fit beautifully. But at the same time, we want it to be practical. We want that practical elegance. So, throughout the day, you’re wearing a suit
for twelve hours you feel like it’s a second skin. You can move about it in. You can function in it. It is comfortable to wear for twelve hours every business day. We’re probably looking at about four weeks
for a fitting And I’ll see you and we’ll slip your jacket on. We’ll see you in four weeks. My colleague, Mr. Malone, will come in and
take some trousers now. Thank you very much, sir. –John Malone. –Pleasure to meet you. Matthew. –Alright. How are you going to support them? –Umm. –With side straps? –I’d say so, yeah. –Cut high in the waist? –Yeah, I’m having a waist coat. –You’re having a waist coat, okay. –Forty-five. So a couple of things we’ll always do. Make sure the cloth is flat. Make sure the edges are together. Okay. Shears. All the cutters and all the tailors have their
own shears. Obviously, our cutting shears are quite large,
quite weighty. We know our own shears. First line of polish in the cutting room is I’d be able to pick out my shears blind-folded. Obviously, tape measure, which we always have. String is not. And then the other main…it’s very simple
really. We are not overly reliant on technology. This little symbol here just means it’s also
a jetted pocket. You’ll find all sorts of customer requests. One customer used to have a pocket in the
back of his jacket and the reason for it was when he was on a plane he could put his passport
in and his ticket. So it was always easy to get his tickets and he didn’t have to go fumbling. That’s the beauty of what we’re doing. Being bespoke the customer can ask for these requests and we will try and sort them out these little details and these quirks. And that’s the beauty of it. That’s why it’s bespoke. This is what the cutters do at this stage. This is where the cutter is deciding where
to take shape and stuff. At the next level is where the tailor will
also then do what he does, and he’ll start to shape it by manipulating the cloth. Because what it’s all about with the cutters
and the tailors is putting the necessary marks to shape the suppression and manipulating the cloth to turn something that’s two-dimensional and flat into a three-dimensional object to
place over the individual. Alright. What we do, we check the balance. Armhole pitch, waist, suppression, waistline
throughout… You see the bottom of the coat and this is our little marking signal for
slits at side. At this end here are the sleeves. So, we start to parcel it all up. What will happen is once I’ve put these together… So you’ve got the fundamental building blocks of the garment. This is where nothing goes to waste. So we’ve got the top collar, what we call
the top collar. I’m obviously marking directions of the grain of the cloth just to help and aid the tailor again. You’ve got to think, there’s gonna be the
flaps. There’s gonna be jettings. Job ticket.