Fashion Design A Collection 4 – Spring 2020 – Jacquard Swatches

Fashion Design A Collection 4 – Spring 2020 – Jacquard Swatches

November 23, 2019 2 By Bernardo Ryan


So today I’m going to do more swatch
development for our spring 2020 collection. This is very exciting. I did the
nylon swatch last time where I knitted the yarn first into a thicker string and
then I knitted that thicker fiber which I think didn’t really work. I think that
was kind of a fail for what I was going for. So we’re gonna move on from that.
There’s another technique I really wanted to try today that is something
that I’ve tried before and been quite successful at. It’s this stitch that I
used on a collection I did a few years ago. It’s a two color birdseye jacquard
stitch. It is very textured so you can see on this side there’s two colors.
Contrasting colors. And I did a pattern. And I even put my own little logo in the
knit which I love and if I do a pattern like that with this collection I would
love to do that again. I love putting the logo right in the knit fabric. That’s
really cool and really special I think. And if you look at the other side looks
more like a solid color but you have a lot of texture. If you can kind of see
this texture and movement and it’s a bit of a structured fabric and what
makes it structured is the elastic fiber. The light the cream-colored yarn is 50%
cotton 50% merino wool and the black yarn is actually a super elastic yarn
and that’s what gives it all of this texture on the surface of both
sides. And it’s also what hides the black yarn on this side, where this side looks
mostly light colored is because the black yarn is so elastic and tight it
tightens up in there and it almost kind of hides itself on this side. If you
really stretch it open you can see that it’s like a checkered pattern like a two
color birdseye jacquard normally is. So elastic yarns can do really cool stuff.
They can give you structure in knitted fabrics and you kind of get rid of that
really slouchy characteristic that a lot of knits have like knit sweaters and
things like that which I love kind of creating these new ideas of what
knitwear can do. So the black this black yarn is this is basically what it is. This is a purple version but it’s a super you can see this it’s a super
elastic yarn like super elastic and that’s what the black yarn is. I also
have a second example here. I also designed so I
designed both of these jackets. I did some reversible collections when I lived
in Shanghai a few years ago and I worked with a little workshop in Shanghai that
made these. They made the samples and they made the production for me
so these garments were not made on this machine and these are about I think
these are about a 12 gauge so it’s gonna be a little bit different and that’s why
I’m not really sure how it’s gonna work out on a 7 gauge machine. It’s going to be
different but it’s same concept here is where I’m on the one side I did
contrasting colors black and white. The black yarn is 100% cotton and the white
is the same like the purple. This white yarn is super stretchy elastic nylon.
So that’s one side and you can also kind of see it’s really it’s quite stretchy
and then the other side of this jacket it’s less white anyway. It looks
more like a solid color especially from far away and you just kind of get this
really nice texture. You can kind of can you kind of see this texture that’s
going on all over this jacket. It’s really cool and you can kind of see it’s
very it’s a very structured fabric. I love doing structured knits. It’s really
cool. That’s the concept roughly that we’re trying to do but we’re gonna do it
on a 7 gauge machine with slightly different yarns. I have here a 100%
bamboo viscose. For spring I think this is a little bit better than obviously
something with wool. We definitely don’t want wool for a spring collection. This
is 100% bamboo. Or we could also use something like 100% cotton,
100% linen would be fine. Something that has no stretch. So our one yarn has
no stretch. That’s gonna be our bamboo viscose. And then I actually have a few
options for stretch yarns to try. I’m gonna try one or all three of them. I’m
not sure which. This yarn is very similar to like the ones I had made in Shanghai.
It’s just really really really really stretchy. It’s awesome and I love this
color. I love how saturated this color is. It’s this when you do like nylon you
know that like it can really absorb color really well and the colors can be
super saturated and vibrant. I love this color. You can see here when I
pull it off the cone it is a very stretchy yarn. So that’s option one for
the elastic yarn. Second option I have. This one I definitely want to try. This
is less stretchy because I’m afraid the purple one might be a little too
stretchy for a 7 gauge and it’s also kind of fine. This is a slightly chunkier
yarn and this is like a viscose stretch. It has limited stretch definitely. You can
kind of see that it’s stretchy but it’s not like the full-on elastic. So that one
I want to try but that might work better I think even for a 7 gauge than the
super duper elastic one. And the last one I have here. This is a cotton stretch
which is also you know good for spring. Hopefully it’s pretty lightweight.
It’s a chunkier yarn as well. This is the chunkiest of the three elastic yarns.
You can see on this one. This is probably the least stretchy and the chunkiest. I
want to definitely try those first two and this might be the last option that I
I also want to try. I think I’m actually gonna try the viscose first because this
is the medium weight and it’s also a medium stretch. And then we can kind of
see how this works and then go from either the stretch to the stretch to
yarn or to the less stretchy yarn and kind of work our way from the middle in
one direction or the other. So I’m setting up my yarn on the machine. I
would like to just do something really simple. Probably like a grid. All I want
to see now is how these yarns knit and basically what they do when they’re
knitted together so I think we’re just gonna do kind of like a grid. A really
rough grid pattern. Here on these patterns you can see that I did this is
kind of like a reptile inspired pattern. Kind of architectural just a grid
square in the middle and it kind of forms out into reptile pattern smaller
onto the sides. And on this actually this jacket was part of a spring collection
because it’s cotton it’s just cotton and nylon. This was inspired by like cocoon
shapes and cocoons that butterflies make. So the pattern is not quite so
geometrical as the reptile one but you can kind of see it’s just like these
kind of like stripes. Like more organic stripes kind of a thing and I actually
liked this. This worked out really well for the texture that it creates in this
fabric. The texture came out really really nice. We’re just going to start
with 20 needles. Let’s start with the
stretchy yarn because when we do cuffs and we do the starter doing the
stretching yarn would probably be nice for the starting-point stuff like the
wrists and the hem so they don’t bag out. All right so stretchy yarn. We’re
starting with the viscose stretch medium weight and medium stretch yarn.
I love this stitch, I adore this stitch and this stitch has been probably my best
selling stitch as far as like garments go. Everybody loves to see this stitch
and asks me how I did it all the time and how I developed it and I’ve never
really shared it publicly before how what the stitch was or how I did it. I
just never you know wanted to take the time to share it. But now that I’m
developing a whole collection and I really want to develop it and share it
with you guys the whole process. This is really important to basically share as
much as I can in as much detail as I can. Sometimes it’s difficult on video
because of editing I don’t the videos to be too long and sometimes
development can take a really long time when you’re doing swatches and things
like that. I’m trying to share as much as I possibly can in as much detail as I
can in this collection because it’s just fun to share and I think that it’s
really interesting for you guys if you’re curious how a Joe Schmo designer
like me goes about designing a collection. This is basically it and just
for reference I’m doing this in my house I don’t do this anywhere special. I have
a setup with lights and things like that and I have my machine and I have a
sewing machine and I have all the bare basics of what I need to make a
collection. This is really bare-bones. I buy my yarn that I need to make the
collection. Everything’s very very basic. So I’m casting on. I wish I had a
smaller comb. Putting my comb in. It’s maybe a next
purchase I need to make. A tiny comb. A tiny comb for squash development because
these this comb is like way too long. Okay so I got my weights. This is going
to be good for balancing the comb underneath. Okay maybe we just do it
really even so three down three up three down three up three down three down. Okay
that’s nice and even. That’s the front of our stitch. It’s going to be these squares just to test out how the texture
and how it all works together. Back bed is just going to be we’ll start with the
first needle every other needle because that is what happens on the back of
a birdseye jacquard. That never changes. The back bed is just every other needle. This is a lot slower on this machine
than on in auto machine but for development it’s sometimes good because you
can actually think and now we switch yarns and now we’re doing the bamboo
viscose that has no stretch. We also need the part buttons up. Going the other
direction. I’m actually gonna do this by hand because it’s just a little bit
easier without having to switch the bed back and forth because now I have to
switch it to this side because we have this yarn on this side. It’s a small
enough swatch that a lot of my birdseye jacquard swatches you know they’re small.
They’re usually 20 needles by 20 rows is what I do. And same placement as the
blue as before. Oh we’re alternating the back rows
though are changing to where the white was because you want that alternating
checker back. And this is definitely gonna take some time. I’m gonna do a few
more rows is gonna take a long time so I’m going to cut the camera off in a
second and come back when this is finished to show you guys how it turned
out basically. I’m gonna finish this white row so you can kind of see what
I’m doing. So now I’m gonna finish that was two
rows I’m gonna go ahead and finish the next 18 rows take it off the machine
steam it and show you guys what it looks like and see how the stretch and how the
texture ends up being. Let’s see. Okay so I did just finish this swatch. As you can
see it is stretchy and it feels really nice and stretchy but the effect is not
the same. There is basically no texture and you can see both colors on the back
side which you should only be able to see them mostly the white on the back
side and there should be a lot of texture like a grid texture like the
front and there’s not. We’re comparing it against this really textured fabric. So
the back should be like the jacket. Mostly the light color and it is not. And
it should have texture and it this swatch does not have texture. So that
means that we are now moving on to using the higher stretch yarn which is gonna
be this purple one. It’s a finer yarn. I think I’m just gonna try one end first
and see what happens. But this might have to be a two end yarn on this machine
because it’s quite fine. But let’s try one end and see if we can get the effect
of more texture first and then we’ll think about it. So I’m gonna change out
this viscose stretch yarn. It’s just not quite cutting it. It’s not stretchy
enough. So for this technique to work it seems that you really need a full-on
maximum high stretch yarn. And we’re gonna stick with the original bamboo. The
same bamboo viscose non-stretch fiber. I’m gonna start knitting this one
basically the exact same pattern I’m just gonna do a grid pattern we want to
see if it comes out with texture mostly hiding the purple yarn on the
backside. So I’ll come back at you when I’ve got this one done and then we’ll
kind of compare the two and see if this stitch has any potential on the 7 gauge
machine. I just finished the second swatch. This one does look a lot better
it does have a lot more texture and it’s a lot stretchier than this first swatch
that came out really flat. You can even see the back. The purple is a little bit
more hidden than the blue stitches so that’s good. The higher stretch is
working and doing what it’s supposed to be doing. But it’s still a little bit. I
think it’s loose tension for this machine meaning
it still needs to be plied up more. The purple definitely needs to be 2 or 3 ply
at least 2. I just did 1 ply here and it’s not enough. The bamboo is fine.
The bamboo is 1 ply. Tighter tension. I would just say tighter tension and 2 or 3
plies of the purple. I’m gonna think about it and see if this is something I
want to keep developing. I’m gonna look into other things as well. Look into my
swatch collection and see what would be good for spring knitwear and what other
ways we can form structured fabric with knit. Definitely with the elastic but
doing the jacquard the bird’s a jacquard it’s very labor-intensive on a machine
like this so I might do a different stitch but still do the elastic knit
structure technique. So let’s see. There’s a lot more I want to explore. And
remember this is our control which is a 12-gauge knitted on an auto machine. This
really nice textured fabric that I designed and had knitted by a workshop
in Shanghai. They did such a great job on this fabric. It came out really nice and
really textured. Really awesomely reversible. So that’s what we’re going
for on the 7 gauge machine and it’s definitely gonna take a lot more
fiddling to get to a successful point that is really exactly like this but on a
chunkier gauge. We’re going in the right direction.
This purple yarn I actually got in Shanghai and I don’t know if I can find
it here in the States or if I can order it. So that’s another issue if I want to
continue developing this technique with any stitch I need to figure out a good
supplier that can supply me with the highly highly elastic yarn. So we’ll see.
I might look into that a little bit more if it’s something I’m still interested
in. But I’m gonna look at other avenues as well. It’s exciting and it’s you know
again it’s a lot of failures but you learn along the way and hopefully come
up with some really nice fabrics at the end that are really really special.
Thanks for watching and as always let me know below what you think. Let me know if
you have any questions about the development that I’m doing or if you
have any questions about development that you are doing. And don’t forget to
like this video and hit subscribe if you want to follow me along this journey of
creating a spring 2020 collection. Bye ๐Ÿ™‚