Blinking Eye Transition FCPX Tutorial – No Plugins Required

Blinking Eye Transition FCPX Tutorial – No Plugins Required

September 13, 2019 8 By Bernardo Ryan


Today, we’re going to take a look at how to add this eye blink transition to
your video, created completely in Final Cut Pro. Hey guys, whats up. This is Serge, and welcome back to my channel for another Final Cut Pro tutorial. First, set your playhead between your two
clips, and move it back two seconds, by pressing Control P, and entering minus, two, and period. Press enter to move your playhead back two
seconds. Next, open the effects browser, select the masks category, and drag and drop the Shape Mask over your
first clip. In the viewer, zoom out on your clip, and use the on screen controls to adjust the
shape to better resemble eye lids. First, drag the white curvature circle all the way to the right to make your shape
into an oval. Next, use the green handles to adjust the
shape of the mask, until the inside frame is just on the outside
of your clip. Drag the feather ring out until the value in the inspector is at about 200. Add a keyframe to the Radius parameter, and click the disclosure triangle beside the
transform parameter, and add a keyframe to the position values. Move the playhead ahead about 25 frames, by either using the right arrow key, or pressing Control P, and entering plus, two, five, and enter. Click and drag either the top or the bottom
handle on your mask to partially close it. Move the playhead ahead another nine or ten
frames, and adjust the shape mask until it appears almost completely open. Move ahead eighteen frames, and pull one of the vertical handles all the way in towards the middle of the frame. You’ll still see a little light in the middle
of your frame because of the feathering. Without moving your playhead, add a keyframe to the feather parameter in
the inspector. Move the playhead ahead two more frames, and drag the feather slider all the way down. Your clip should now look like this. Now, lets copy this mask to your next clip. With your first clip selected, press Command C on your keyboard to copy this
clip. Select your second clip, and press Shift Command V to paste only the attributes from your first
clip. In the popup window, make sure you have Shape
Mask selected, and at the bottom, for Keyframe Timing, select stretch to fit. This will paste your shape mask, and all the keyframes onto your second clip. Next, you need to delete the keyframes from
the first clip, and re-animate the mask. With your second clip selected, in the inspector, click on the hooked arrows beside all the
keyframed parameters. Resize your shape mask until its about the same shape as you started
with in the first clip. Set your playhead at the start of the second
clip, and from there move it ahead about twenty
frames. Adjust your shape mask to eyes closed position, and bring the feather slider down until the screen is completely black. Add a keyframe here to the feather and the
radius parameters. Move the playhead two frames ahead, and set the Feather value to 200. Move ahead 10 frames, and adjust the mask until its about half open. Move five frames ahead, and close it again. Manually add a keyframe to the Feather parameter. Move two frames ahead, and bring the slider
down. Move two more frames ahead, and set the value at 200 again. Manually add a keyframe to the Radius parameter
here. Move ahead eight frames, and adjust the mask so its almost completely
open. Move three frames ahead, and close the mask. Now, move five frames ahead and completely
open the mask. Now, to make this effect look a little more
realistic, lets add and keyframe a little bit of blur
to our clips. In the effects browser, select the Blurs category, and add the Gaussian Blur effect to both clips. What you need to do next is line up the blur
amount with the keyframes you set for the mask. Control click on your first clip, and select Show Video Animation. This shows you all the keyframes set for your
Shape Mask. Set your playhead on the first keyframe, and bring the blur amount slider all the way
down. Add a keyframe here. Move to the second keyframe, and bring the amount up to around thirty. Move to the next keyframe, and bring the slider down to 15. Move to the last keyframe, and set the blur amount up to about 60. Lets move to the second clip. Open the Video Animation, and set your playhead on the first keyframe. Set the blur amount to 60, and add a keyframe. Move ahead a couple keyframes, and set the blur amount to about 30. Move four keyframes ahead, and manually add a keyframe to the blur amount
slider. Move to the next keyframe, and bring the blur amount all the way down. Your clip should now look something like this. This does take a little bit of time and messing
around, but the finished result looks pretty cool. If you want an easier way to accomplish the
same effect, come back for my next video, where I’ll show you how you can download and install a custom plugin that accomplishes everything we did today. The plugin will be available free of charge for a limited time for my subscribers, so if you haven’t yet, hit the subscribe
button and click on the bell to turn on notifications
so you don’t miss it. Thanks for watching, and I’ll see you next
week.